Banner Icon could not be loaded.

 

1st Marine Logistics Group

Victory through Logistics

Combat engineer is ready to provide aid in Sri Lanka

By Cpl. Timothy Childers | 1st Marine Logistics Group | July 26, 2013

Photos
prev
1 of 2
next
Corporal Jeremy W. Myers, left, and Cpl. Nicholas C. Wray, both combat engineers with Bridge Company, 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, pose for a photograph in their office aboard Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 24, 2013. Myers and Wray will join other members of the U.S. Armed Forces and Sri Lankan Military as they provide 
medical, dental and engineering aid to locals in Sri Lanka during Pacific Angel 13-4. The two combat engineers are slated to repair and reconstruct schools, including building bamboo blinds, painting walls, patching holes and building roofs.

Corporal Jeremy W. Myers, left, and Cpl. Nicholas C. Wray, both combat engineers with Bridge Company, 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, pose for a photograph in their office aboard Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 24, 2013. Myers and Wray will join other members of the U.S. Armed Forces and Sri Lankan Military as they provide medical, dental and engineering aid to locals in Sri Lanka during Pacific Angel 13-4. The two combat engineers are slated to repair and reconstruct schools, including building bamboo blinds, painting walls, patching holes and building roofs. (Photo by Cpl. Timothy Childers)


Photo Details | Download |

Corporal Jeremy W. Myers joined the Marine Corps to become a combat engineer. He now serves with Bridge Company, 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, and is slated to join other members of the U.S. Armed Forces and Sri Lankan Military as they provide medical, dental and engineering aid to locals in Sri Lanka during Pacific Angel 13-4. Myers, is a 27-year-old native of Mechanicsville, Md.

Corporal Jeremy W. Myers joined the Marine Corps to become a combat engineer. He now serves with Bridge Company, 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, and is slated to join other members of the U.S. Armed Forces and Sri Lankan Military as they provide medical, dental and engineering aid to locals in Sri Lanka during Pacific Angel 13-4. Myers, is a 27-year-old native of Mechanicsville, Md. (Photo by Cpl. Timothy Childers)


Photo Details | Download |

7/26/2013 --

CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. – When Marines are asked why they joined the Marine Corps, they will likely give a number of responses. Whether they joined to serve their country or for the education benefits after their tour of duty, most responses share something in common, their decision to better themselves or the world around them.

Corporal Jeremy W. Myers is one of those Marines. He joined the Marine Corps to become a combat engineer.

Originally, the engineering field appealed to him because of his fascination with high explosives and disarming improvised explosive devices. This soon evolved into something bigger than himself.

“I wanted to become a combat engineer as soon as my recruiter told me about the job,” said Myers, who is now a member of Bridge Company, 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group. “Apart from my job, I joined because I wanted to give back to a country that has given me so much. We were also a nation at war and I wanted to do my part in helping out.”

After having some time under his belt serving the Corps throughout three deployments, Myers discovered what his true passion was in the military, his ability to use the tools he has learned to help others. He has now been given the chance to use those tools again.

“I’m motivated on a daily basis because I know I am making a difference,” said Myers, a 27-year-old native of Mechanicsville, Md. “Helping my junior Marines excel in their daily jobs and knowing I get to help people out when the time arises is what motivates me as a combat engineer now. Which is why I’m excited about helping out an [undeveloped] country.”

The country Myers speaks of is Sri Lanka. Myers will be joining Cpl. Nicholas C. Wray, a combat engineer in the same unit, for Pacific Angel 13-4.

During the operation, Myers and Wray will join other members of the U.S. Armed Forces and Sri Lankan Military as they provide medical and dental aid at three separate locations.

The two combat engineers are slated to repair and reconstruct schools, including building bamboo blinds, painting walls, patching holes and constructing roofs.

“We’re going to help out by [repairing] a few schools,” said Myers. “I like that I’ll be able to help these school kids have a good place to learn. They need to have a good environment to learn at.”

When Myers is not preparing for a trip to South-East Asia, he works at the Bridge Company office. It is a change from what he has done in the past but he continues to lead as a Non-Commissioned Officer.

“Over the years I have learned how to lead others in almost any situation, to have confidence in myself and my abilities and how to handle any situation with tact and dignity,” said Myers.

His Marines are a testament to his hard work and leadership.

“Myers really does his job well,” said Lance Cpl. Christina E. Maskley, a combat engineer from the same unit. “He motivates me. He’s all about being respectful and giving courtesies to senior Marines. He’s a good Marine to work with.”

This will be the second time Myers has traveled outside the United States to provide engineering support to another nation.

“One of the perks of being in the military is traveling to other countries,” added Myers. “Since I’ve joined, I’ve come to really enjoy traveling. I was stationed in Okinawa and have been to Thailand and the Philippines.”

Myers is just one example of Marines who have learned to love the work they do. It may be traveling to exotic locations throughout the globe or supporting operations from the rear, Marines will continue to work diligently to carry out the mission.




No Comments


Add Comment

(required)
(required)
  Post Comment