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Cpl. Timothy Headrick, 21, Green Bay, Wis., embark noncommissioned officer, Combat Logistics Regiment 17, 1st Marine Logistics Group, points out where to place his equipment here March 3. The devices kept with the embark Marines are going to be used for Mojave Viper training at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif.

Photo by Pfc. Jerrick J. Griffin

Embarkation: grease of the Marine Corps axle Yuma helps prepare equipment for Mojave Viper training

3 Mar 2009 | Pfc. Jerrick J. Griffin

Inspecting, organizing and maintaining equipment for an entire regiment in only a week seems like a difficult job. But it’s not a hard task for the embarkers of Combat Logistics Regiment 17, 1st Marine Logistics Group.

The embark Marines along with help of mechanics from Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., are making sure the equipment is working properly before it’s sent to be used for Mojave Viper training at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif.

“We provide mechanical support here, making sure the vehicles and devices are ready and usable for training purposes,” said Sgt. Macgregor Wilkinson, 24, Brescott, Ariz., vehicle mechanic, Combat Logistics Company 16, CLR-15, 1st MLG, MCAS Yuma, Ariz.

Camp Pendleton is serving as an assembly area between Yuma and Twentynine Palms to ensure the vehicles and gear being used for the pre-deployment training is functional. Having fully functional equipment allows the Marines to focus more on training instead of worrying about their gear and vehicles malfunctioning.

If the gear is broken or unsafe for the training, embark sends it back to the original unit for replacements.

The tasks embarkers have aren’t as easy as they seem. Workers have to account for the gear in their possession and organize it to ensure it’s functioning properly and the heavy machines can operate smoothly.

1st MLG embark has gear distributed to nine different units and accounts for what each unit has and what maintenance is needed to complete the mission.

Embarkation is the grease to the Marine Corps’ axle, said Cpl. Timothy Headrick, 21, Green Bay, Wis., embark noncommissioned officer, CLR-17, about their role in the operation.

“We pretty much have to make sure all the gear is organized so that everything here can flow well,” said Cpl. Clayton Tubbs, 20, South Penn, Calif., embark noncommissioned officer, CLR-17. “It’s not easy to organize all of this gear and maintain an open spot for the (heavy machinery) to operate in while getting more equipment brought to you.”

By the end of the week, the area should be cleared of all the equipment being shipped to Twentynine Palms Calif. for use with Mojave Viper training.


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