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Marines attending Combat Logistics Regiment 17 Corporals’ Course check their azimuth during a land navigation class at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Aug. 17. The corporals attending the course learned basic leadership skills needed to lead the Marines under their charge. They also learned close-order drill, small-unit leadership, Marine Corps common skills, sword manual and other Marine Corps knowledge.

Photo by Lance Cpl. Jerrick Griffin

Corporals Course gives NCOs leadership skills for success

17 Aug 2011 | Lance Cpl. Jerrick Griffin

‘Fall In!’shouted the corporal as the rest of the Marines in the area scurried to get into formation and ready themselves for the next command.
That’s how the day started for the corporals attending the CombatLogistics Regiment 17 Corporals Course here, Aug. 17.
The corporals attending the course learned basic leadership skills needed to lead the Marines
under their charge. They learned close-order drill, small-unit leadership, Marine Corps common skills,
sword manual and other Marine Corps knowledge.
“The 1st MLG Corporals Course or any corporals course in the Marine Corps is designed to give the corporals basic fundamental leadership skills,” said Gunnery Sgt. JoAnna Mendoza, staff noncommissioned officer in charge of Corporals Course, CLR-17, 1st MLG. “It’s a basic foundation for any Marine NCO.”
The 3-week course is designed to challenge the instructors to create better leaders and better Marines.
“The course is more demanding than anything else based on the coordinating instruction that we’ve had,” said Cpl. Ryan Cordle, training clerk, CLR-17, 1st MLG, from Orlando, Fla. “We’re held to a higher standard as NCOs, and that’s why we’re in this course, to learn what to do.”
During the course, the noncommissioned officers learned a great deal.
“At the beginning it was a rough transition,” said Mendoza. “A lot of them are not used to the basic customs and courtesies, like the proper greetings of the day, standing when someone senior talks to you … there is a difference and they’re improving everyday.”
Even though it started out bumpy in the beginning, by the end of the course the NCOs will be well polished and ready to pass on what they have learned to the future NCOs of the Marine Corps.
“It’s very important because when they make that transition from junior Marine to noncommissioned officer, they are taking on that torch,” said Mendoza, from Eloy, Ariz. “They’re the torch holders, keepers of the flame, they carry on these traditions and pass those onto the junior Marines to continue to make our Marine Corps strong, and to continue to pass those courtesies and traditions on for many years to come.”
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