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Corporal Jayun Thibodeaux, a chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense specialist with Combat Logistics Regiment 17, 1st Marine Logistics Group, poses with an APU-77 personal radiation detector aboard Camp Pendleton, Calif., Aug. 27, 2013. Marines with CBRN train 20 percent of Marines per regiment on how to detect, contain and utilize proper decontamination techniques.

Photo by Lance Cpl. Cody Haas

CBRN instructor trains Marines using real-life experience

5 Sep 2013 | Lance Cpl. Cody Haas

CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. – Radiation, biological agents, toxic gases and toxic agents from nuclear waste are difficult to recognize to the untrained eye. For one logistics Marine, it is a daily mission.

Corporal Jayun Thibodeaux, a chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense specialist with Combat Logistics Regiment 17, 1st Marine Logistics Group, trains 20 percent of Marines per regiment on how to detect, contain and utilize proper decontamination techniques.

“I introduce Marines to basic principles and techniques for reconnaissance, survey, sampling, containment and decontamination,” said Thibodeaux.

Thibodeaux maintains a high level of expertise by staying up-to-date with the latest gear and most useful techniques.

By signing up for additional classes, he is able to test what he learns first hand during basic CBRN courses in which he instructs.

“I like teaching Marines this type of training because I know it works,” said Thibodeaux, a native of Opelousas, La. “[The Marines] understand just how serious this training is when I give examples with my first-hand experience.”

He was one of approximately 15 Marines in his field to be sent to Japan on a humanitarian mission during the Fukushima disaster in 2011, when a reactor on a nuclear power station in Fukushima overheated from damage caused by a tsunami, despite countless fail-safes.

Thibodeaux volunteered for the mission as soon as he could. He immediately knew he was meant for the job.

Thibodeaux spent long hours and late shifts checking and clearing civilians for transportation out of the immediate area after the disaster. It was all worth it in his eyes.

“I knew I would be helping people,” said Thibodeaux. “That’s what I enjoy doing. I’m glad I was able to make a difference for those people I helped.”

From this experience he has learned first-hand the dangers of a CBRN threat and wishes to relay that message to his students.

“Every day I instruct a new class, that’s my goal, to get them to walk away having learned something that could one day save their lives.”

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